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New Book, First Review

Only been out a few days, from my pseudonym, but the personal feedback I’ve had has been great.

Here’s the first review:

James Wilde weaves this final book in the series with such skill and attention that i struggled to put the book down at night. His characters are as always perfectly drawn, fallible yet heroic, his friends dedicated, funny, sardonic and better men than they know. There is betrayal, heroism, vast action and terrible fear …. true light can only been seen after terrible darkness and it is through this darkness that James takes the reader…. This is simply an excellent tale, one of the best re-imagining of the iconic Arthur myth out there, and for me James Wilde’s best book to date.

New Year, New Novel

Crashing into 2020 was a brutal awakening after a lazy holiday period with my brain pretty much switched off. This is the first time I’ve got a book out in the New Year so I had to propel myself into the publicity period from a standing start. There are easier ways.

As most people know, I’ve been writing historical novels for the past few years – history being one of my particular and peculiar interests – and I chose to publish them under the pseudonym of James Wilde to avoid any confusion for readers who a) prefer my fantasy work or b) don’t like history.

On January 9, The Bear King hits bookshelves, real or digital. This is the final volume in the Dark Age trilogy which imagines how the legend of King Arthur could have arisen out of history. 

You can tell that from the strapline above: Before King Arthur. Before Camelot. Before Excalibur. Don’t say I don’t make it easy for you.

I’d like it if you bought it (and picked up the two other books, Pendragon and Dark Age). If you want to check it out first, go here.

Here’s the blurb:

Bridging the gap between ‘Game of Thrones’ and Bernard Cornwell comes the third and final chapter in James Wilde’s epic adventure of betrayal, battle and bloodshed . . .

AD 375 – The Dark Age is drawing near . . .

As Rome’s legions abandon their forts, chaos grows on the fringes of Britannia. In the far west, the shattered forces of the House of Pendragon huddle together in order to protect the royal heir – their one beacon of hope. 

For Lucanus, their great war leader, is missing, presumed dead. And the people are abandoning them. For in this time of crisis, a challenger has arisen, a False King with an army swollen by a horde of bloody-thirsty barbarians desperate for vengeance.

One slim hope remains for Lucanus’ band of warrior-allies, the Grim Wolves. Guided by the druid, Myrrdin, they go in search of a great treasure – a vessel that is supposedly a gift from the gods. With such an artefact in their possession, the people would surely return and rally to their cause? Success will mean a war unlike any other, a battle between two kings for a legacy that will echo down the centuries. And should they fail? Well, then all is lost.

In The Bear King, James Wilde’s rousing reimagining of how the myth of King Arthur, Excalibur and Camelot rose out of the fragile pages of history reaches its shattering conclusion . . .

Best TV Drama 2019

So much TV. This year it’s sometimes been hard to keep up, with all the new streaming services rolling out. Somehow I managed (no choice really – I have to watch a little of everything new for work. Can’t write TV if you don’t know what the current landscape looks like).

Here, then, is the best TV drama I saw during the last year. And there has been some truly great work screened. I’ve been enjoying some of Apple’s new launches, but they haven’t yet quite hit that critical level to make it to the top. There were also several shows I expected to drop in here, but in the end fell at the last (looking at you, Game of Thrones).

Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

10. The Marvelous Mrs Maisel

(Amazon Prime) I resisted including this last year, not wholly sure if it should be filed under comedy. But the quality is just phenomenal, and the drama is certainly there, if in ‘light’ mode. The recreation of 50s New York is perfect. Yet it also manages to tell a story relevant to today, with its sly look at gender, family and work. Rachel Brosnahan is luminous as the title character, but all the cast here do brilliant work.

9. After Life

(Netflix) Another one that could have been considered comedy with the pedigree of its creator and star Ricky Gervais. But this is a serious work with something important to say about grief and finding the value in life when you don’t have any faith. There are certainly laugh out loud moments. But there are heartbreaking ones too. A humanist masterpiece.

8.Giri/Haji

Shown on the BBC, this was a groundbreaking piece of work for UK TV. It’ll be available to the rest of the world via Netflix next year. A Tokyo detective comes to London to search for his missing brother following the murder of a Yakuza member. That death ripples out to touch several lives. Joe Barton’s scripts avoid the cliches and dive into an almost dreamlike state, digging out the essential humanity in cultures that seem at odds with each other.

7. Euphoria

(HBO) Ostensibly a teen drama, but one which digs deep into what it’s like to live – and try to survive – in the great Age of Disruption. Drugs, naked selfies, sex as currency, a raw examination of addiction, this is a long way from The Breakfast Club. Zendaya grounds it as the central character and commentator (although spoiled slightly by one extended sequence which served as a video for her new single).

6. Russian Doll

(Netflix) What seemed to be another Groundhog Day, quickly diverges into a twisty mystery. Centred on a brilliant performance by Natasha Lyonne, who also co-created, the show follows games developer Nadia Vulvokov as she dies again and again only to be reborn in the same situation. Clever, funny and moving, it’s well worth its four Emmy nominations.

5. The Handmaid’s Tale

(Hulu) Dark and desperate, The Handmaid’s Tale is as much about modern America as it is about its dystopian setting. The early episodes were a hard watch, but now the story has progressed, flickers of hope and righteous anger move to centre-stage. A fantastic performance by Elisabeth Moss, she starts to reveal the cracks within the central character June Osborne that Margaret Atwood’s novel sets up.

4. Chernobyl

(HBO/Sky) Not by any stretch of the imagination ‘entertainment’, this is a grim but devastatingly human examination of the nuclear disaster in Ukraine in 1986. The award-winning script by Craig Mazin dramatises the failings of the Soviet system set against the struggle of regular people to try to save the day. Jared Harris and Stellan Skarsgard provide the odd couple central performances.

3. Billions

(Showtime) Billions goes from strength to strength and in any other year would well have held the number one slot in this list. The Shakespearean battle between Paul Giamatti’s Chuck Rhodes and Damian Lewis’ Bobby Axelrod in the worlds of high finance and law takes on new dimensions and gets even more brutal. In a series of standout characters and actors, Asia Kate Dillon’s non-binary Taylor Mason wins hands down.

2. Watchmen

(HBO) A slow burn that took just about everyone by surprise. Damon Lindelof’s sequel/reimagining of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbon’s 1980s graphic novel is a masterpiece that manages to capture the groundbreaking approach of the source material and then break even more new ground. Tackling racism, gender and power in America today, it still manages to capture an emotional chore. Regina King is a brilliant guide through the mazey storytelling.

  1. Succession

(HBO) Springboarding off the real-world accounts of media mogul Rupert Murdoch and his clan, Succession is a study of how emotional abuse destroys lives. That doesn’t sound a bundle of laughs, but there’s black humour aplenty in this tale of a declining media power broker pitting his children against each other to take the mantle from him. Much of the enjoyment comes from watching the slow motion car crash of these characters disintegrating in spectacular fashion. A brilliant, multifaceted work.

TV Showrunning

In the US TV industry, the writers have all the power. They run the shows, answering directly to the studios and networks. Not so much in the UK where the writer is kicked to one side and cut out of most decision making.

All that is changing with the rise of the streamers. Netflix, Amazon Prime, Peacock and the rest all want writers at the heart of their new shows. Because they’re buying a creative vision and they know the best person to fix problems or move everything forward is the creative visionary, right?

This weekend I attended the Introduction to Showrunning Seminar organised by the Writers Guild. The one the WGA runs in LA is attended by every writer getting their hands on a show for network, cable and streaming, but this is the first time one has been run in the UK.

Learned a massive amount. Some great speakers who knew the ins and outs of this hugely demanding, but equally rewarding job. The writer manages everything, from scripts to casting to hiring directors and DPs to the final edit.

The audience was packed with every TV writer you’ve ever heard of, which gives you some idea of how important showrunning is viewed.

And I can’t express how good it was to hear writers talking about taking control.

Stone Circles Are Alive

Stonehenge

For readers of my Age of Misrule novels, see, it’s all true…

Studies conducted by the late physicist John Burke also discovered how the stones of Avebury are deliberately placed and aligned so as to focus electro-magnetic currents to flow in a premeditated direction using an identical principle to modern atomic particle colliders, in which airborne ions are steered in one direction.

The symbol of the serpent has always been a culturally shared metaphor of the earth’s meandering lines of force, what scientists refer to as telluric currents.

Click on the link above for more research into stone circles.

TV Work

Generally I don’t talk about all the TV work I’m doing. When you’re creating new series, there are usually long periods of ditch-digging with the team, sweating, bouncing ideas around and drafting and re-drafting pilot scripts as conceptions change. And even then it doesn’t always come together.

But, as several people have asked, I’m currently in development with seven returning series for UK and international streaming broadcasters, across a range of genres.

More when I’m contractually allowed to speak about any of them.

There’s A Dark Age Coming

Copies of the paperback edition of Dark Age just arrived from my editor. Looks great. The team has done a fantastic job with all the covers for the current series.

It’s in shops shortly, or you can order it online here.

The blurb says:

Bridging the gap between ‘Game of Thrones’ and Bernard Cornwell comes the second chapter in James Wilde’s epic adventure of betrayal, battle and bloodshed . . .

It is AD 367, and Roman Britain has fallen to the vast barbarian horde which has invaded from the north. Towns burn, the land is ravaged and the few survivors flee. The army of Rome – once the most effective fighting force in the world – has been broken, its spirit lost and its remaining troops shattered.

Yet for all the darkness, there is hope. And it rests with one man. His name is Lucanus who they call the Wolf. He is a warrior, and he wears the ancient crown of the great war leader, Pendragon, and he wields a sword bestowed upon him by the druids. With a small band of trusted followers, Lucanus ventures south to Londinium where he hopes to bring together an army and make a defiant stand against the invader.

But within the walls of that great city there are others waiting on his arrival – hidden enemies who want more than anything to possess the great secret that has been entrusted to his care. To seize it would give them power beyond imagining. To protect it will require bravery and sacrifice beyond measure. And to lose it would mean the end of everything worth fighting for. 

Before Camelot. Before Excalibur. Before all you know of King Arthur. Here is the beginning of that legend . . .

Buy Pendragon Super-Cheap

…but you have to be quick. Pendragon is available now as Kindle Monthly Deal, for just 99p. It’s a great chance to sample this series from my pseudonym James Wilde, which Amazon describes as ‘bridging the gap between Game of Thrones and Bernard Cornwell.” You can find it here.

The second book Dark Age is already out. And the third, The Bear King, will be published this summer.

Here’s the blurb…

Here is the beginning of a legend. Long before Camelot rose, a hundred years before the myth of King Arthur was half-formed, at the start of the Red Century, the world was slipping into a Dark Age…

It is AD 367. In a frozen forest beyond Hadrian’s Wall, six scouts of the Roman army are found murdered. For Lucanus, known as the Wolf and leader of elite unit called the Arcani, this chilling ritual killing is a sign of a greater threat.

But to the Wolf the far north is a foreign land, a place where daemons and witches and the old gods live on. Only when the child of a friend is snatched will he venture alone into this treacherous world – a territory ruled over by a barbarian horde – in order to bring the boy back home. What he finds there beyond the wall will echo down the years.

A secret game with hidden factions is unfolding in the shadows: cabals from the edge of Empire to the eternal city of Rome itself, from the great pagan monument of Stonehenge to the warrior kingdoms of Gaul will go to any length to find and possess what is believed to be a source of great power, signified by the mark of the Dragon. 

A soldier and a thief, a cut-throat, courtesan and a druid, even the Emperor Valentinian himself – each of these has a part to play in the beginnings of this legend…the rise of the House of Pendragon.