• The Age of Misrule/Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol Interface

    by  • September 21, 2009 • Research Material, Researching the Book, science • 2 Comments

    From Princeton University:

    “Beyond its revolutionary technological applications and scientific impact, the evidence of an active role of consciousness in the establishment of physical reality holds profound implications for our view of ourselves, our relationships to others, and to the cosmos in which we exist. These, in turn, must inevitably impact our values, our priorities, our sense of responsibility, and our style of life. Our ability to acquire, or to generate tangible, measureable information independent of distance or time challenges the foundation of any reductionistic brain-based model of consciousness that may be invoked. The lack of notable correlations in the data with standard learning curves or other recognizable cognitive patterns, combined with the repeatable and distinct gender-related differences, suggest that these abilities may stem from a more fundamental source than heretofore suspected. Certainly, there is little doubt that integration of these changes in our understanding of ourselves can lead to a substantially superior human ethic, wherein the long-estranged siblings of science and spirit, of analysis and aesthetics, of intellect and intuition, and of many other subjective and objective aspects of human experience can be productively reunited.”

    You know I’ve spent the last nine years writing about this stuff in Age of Misrule, The Dark Age and Kingdom of the Serpent, right?

    And then Dan Brown goes and writes about it in The Lost Symbol and gets all the attention. Bastard.

    It’s interesting and inspiring research and like Brown says in his book, has the potential to instigate a paradigm shift in scientific thinking.

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    2 Responses to The Age of Misrule/Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol Interface

    1. September 21, 2009 at 8:40 pm

      At the risk of sounding a sycophant. He is not, in my mind, a writer of your stature.

    2. Mhanbai
      September 23, 2009 at 12:54 am

      ^ Agreed.

      Dan Brown can do his research well enough, but most of what he writes sounds like a lecture rather than a story.

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