• Tate Britain Appearance

    by  • July 6, 2007 • Projects, Publishing, Symbols and Archetypes • 0 Comments

    Yesterday I gave a very successful lecture at the world-famous Tate Britain art gallery in London, entitled ‘Myth, Memory and the Art of Richard Dadd’. The event was a sell-out, and also pretty ground-breaking on several fronts. I was one of the first – if not the first – genre writer to be invited to the Tate to give a lecture for one of their rightly-acclaimed study days. And personally, it was one of the most high-profile appearances I’ve made.

    I only have praise for the staff and academics at the Tate who treated both myself, and the genre, with a great deal of respect. Before the lecture, the audience toured the gallery to see Dadd’s work and many took the opportunity to ask me about my opinions on the artist and his work. After that I gave the lecture, touching on not only my interest in Dadd and my novella about his most famous painting, ‘The Fairy Feller’s Master Stroke’, but also about other authors influenced by Dadd – Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Angela Carter, Robert Rankin and more. We followed this with an at times intense debate with an art historian about the meaning of Dadd’s work, and a couple of readings from The Fairy Feller novella.

    The novella has gone from strength-to-strength since it won the British Fantasy Award four years ago. The limited edition by PS Publishing has nearly sold out, and the added attention from this Tate event has created interest from across the world. Now I need to find a mainstream publisher interested in reprinting it as part of a collection so it can reach a wider audience.

    [cross-posted]

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    0 Responses to Tate Britain Appearance

    1. TheJovialGnome
      July 6, 2007 at 8:09 pm

      Sounds like a very special kind of day and it shines through the post how much you enjoyed it!

      I know precious little about Dadd and his work apart from what I’ve read in ‘The Fairy Feller’s Master Stroke’ but I love the painting and enjoyed the book – anything which raises your profile and increases interest in your work can only be a good thing!

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